8TH KILOMETER

8TH KILOMETER | BOR | SERBIA 2021

8TH KILOMETER | BOR | SERBIA 2021

THE 6TH
KILOMETER

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km6

Markov Ljubomir, Metallurgical Plants in RTB Bor

Bor, 1991 (Public Library of Bor)

During the last several years in particular we have witnessed a sudden proliferation of pigsties and chicken coops, and the neighborhoods close to the city center are slowly turning into animal farms and vegetable gardens, often watered with wastewater. It has to be noted that the air pollution here is very high, due to Bor‘s smoke practically destroying green areas around the town, so when the stench from the pigsties is added to the lot, it is clear how clean is the air we breathe.
Ecology is designated as the main topic of the sixth kilometer, which draws on the fact that citizens of Bor, as they claim, manage to get relatively freshest air right here, so they consider residing and spending time at this kilometer a prerogative of a kind.

< Markov Ljubomir, Metallurgical Plants in RTB Bor

Bor, 1991 (Public Library of Bor)

Mitić Dragoljub, A Child With a Gas Mask and Protective Gear During a Civil Defense Drill

Bor, 1972 (Public Library of Bor)

The citizens‘ ongoing concerns regarding the survival of this town are directly connected to the problem of environmental sustainability of the municipality of Bor in its strictest and looser sense. The areas of untouched nature with great ecological and even tourist potential stand in stark contrast to industrially developed parts of Bor. Broader natural context of Bor municipality is identified by hills and mountains containing a wealth of natural resources in the form of copper and gold deposits, and also rich in flora and fauna which are constantly endangered by the developing mining industry. Conflict between Bor‘s natural and economic resources – nature vs. mining industry – is reflected in town‘s physical structure comprising two spatial levels.

Nature vs. Mining industry

Salijević Bajram, Lazar‘s Canyon

Bor, 2009 (Public Library of Bor)

Salijević Bajram, Landscape Near Lazar‘s Cave

Bor, 2009 (Public Library of Bor)

Nature vs. Mining industry

The citizens‘ ongoing concerns regarding the survival of this town are directly connected to the problem of environmental sustainability of the municipality of Bor in its strictest and looser sense. The areas of untouched nature with great ecological and even tourist potential stand in stark contrast to industrially developed parts of Bor. Broader natural context of Bor municipality is identified by hills and mountains containing a wealth of natural resources in the form of copper and gold deposits, and also rich in flora and fauna which are constantly endangered by the developing mining industry. Conflict between Bor‘s natural and economic resources – nature vs. mining industry – is reflected in town‘s physical structure comprising two spatial levels.

Salijević Bajram, A Row of 6 Poplar Trees at the Bank of the River Zlot Near Lazar‘s Cave

Bor, 2009 (Public Library of Bor)

Air pollution

At the macro-level, new artificial landscape generated by mining industry dominates town‘s immediate natural surroundings, while at the micro-level RTB‘ Bor’s smelting operations exhaust surrounding forest reserves, using wood as a primary fuel supply.

Bearing in mind that the above-mentioned processes are necessary for the survival of (la)Bor (Bor and labor), the question is how the future of citizens‘ everyday life will look like, and whether the cohabitation of industry and nature in a common spatial frame is sustainable.

The extreme decades-old exploitation and processing of copper ore at Bor municipality territory, which resulted in deposition of mining waste, has affected the forming of disturbed land, contamination of both surface and underground watercourses and air pollution. The problem of air pollution as the main topic in Bor citizens‘ everyday life is manifested in active, but seemingly futile struggle against RTB Bor copper smelter by expressing public discontent and filing charges with the court. The fact that the air pollution levels correlate to the intensity of the mine and copper smelter operations may seem absurd, but it makes the citizens‘ life in this town unsustainable and self-destructive, albeit still necessary.

Markov Ljubomir, Krivelj Tailings 3

Bor, 199? (Public Library of Bor)

How can we
breathe together?

Markov Ljubomir, Old Open-Cast Mine in Bor

Bor, 200? (Public Library of Bor)

< Markov Ljubomir, Krivelj Tailings 3

Bor, 199? (Public Library of Bor)

Markov Ljubomir, Confluence of the
River Bor Joining the River Krivelj

Bor, 200? (Public Library of Bor)

Therefore, within the context of the open-cast mine expansion, unregulated exploitation of nature and burning need for the regeneration of the town, the topic of the sixth kilometer poses a question: “How can we breathe together?” By the projection of this kilometer‘s future, the possibilities of post-industrial emancipation of production processes and ecological revitalization are explored.

The suggested course of emancipation explores the potential of land recultivation by introducing natural vegetation with the aim of regulation, stabilization and monitoring of pollution, as well as “artificial afforestation” of active open-cast mines by using mechanisms for air filtration based on alternative energy sources.

BREATHE - IN